Fabrica hill
Thkio Ppalies, Nicosia, Cyprus, 2021

Group exhibition featuring artworks by Rumen Tropchev, Stelios Kallinikou, Peter Eramian and text by Haytham El-Wardany.

Thkio Ppalies exhibition documentation

their names’ text by Haytham El-Wardany

6 years ago we were looking to rent a shared studio and found a space in Pallouriotissa that used to be a general construction and repair machine shop called Fabrica (factory). On the garage door there was a sticker for a local plumbing services company called Thkio Ppalies. The local residential/industrial feel of the neighbourhood and the Kotsirkas river path that runs parallel enchanted us. The space needed work, it was in a state of disrepair. Thankfully we were recommended a technician who would join us and help transform it. The three of us soon became good friends. Running, managing and maintaining the space together was laborious work. Our friend- ship foundational, holding it all together, with grace.

There’s an archaeological site in Paphos called Fabrica Hill. The name is due to a cotton factory that was locat- ed there during the Middle Ages, however the site dates back to the Hellenistic-Roman period. Fabrica Hill is of great archaeological interest as it contains a number of motifs from different epochs. Situated on a limestone mountain, it is firstly a site of extraction, one of the first known underground quarries. Amongst the artificial caves are catacombs, tombs and places of worship from different eras, some of which are still in use today. During the later Roman period the site was converted into a residential district with buildings, fortifications, traces of a complex water management system and a nymphaeum. In certain parts, one may stumble upon stone carved marks that are speculated to have been used by workers as board games. Towards the south lies an ancient amphitheatre which was used for over 6 centuries until it was destroyed by an earthquake. Overlooking the site is Kings Avenue Mall.